Since there have been a few blog posts about GNOME 3 already, I’m sure you don’t mind me adding one. I’m one of those who don’t do any work, just lurk around and wait for stuff to be fixed — or working in the first place. I also don’t like compiling GNOME myself. I barely touched the already packaged stuff in the repository of our Debian GNOME packaging team. But I run unstable plus stuff from experimental. I’ll thus have a bit of a different experience with GNOME 3 than current testing users who at least in parts don’t seem to like what they’re getting.

That being said… I love it.

No, I don’t mind running network manager on my systems, I even have it on my netbook (Atom processor). I used wicd for a long time because network manager really got nothing done back in the days (half a year ago or what :)). Nowadays, since version 0.9, it works fine for me. No fiddling around with config files, perfect integration in the desktop, and LAN and WLAN Just Work [tm].

No, I don’t like if some weird dependencies dictate what tools to use. I usually used pidgin for messaging, for instance. Now I’m using empathy, simply because it’s best integrated in GNOME. And no, I won’t switch from mutt to evolution. :-P

And there are more such cases. Also, these weird accessibility tools that are stuck in the gnome-shell “top panel”, I don’t need them. Still there. (There’s an extension to remove it, by the way.) Also, I must say, GNOME 3.2 is a lot better than 3.0 already. And I think 3.4 might do the final trick for me.

Fact is, with GNOME 3 I have a much cleaner desktop, there is more room for windows (which is nice on a netbook display), there are web apps which I already use a lot, and it has a professional, not too playful look (i.e. a few effects, clear and consistent theming, no bubbling windows). And the new notification stuff is just awesome, especially with the empathy integration.

Oh, and too many mouse click to access an application? 1) Put your most used apps in the favorites bar (or whatever it is called); it’s just one click then. 2) Press your meta-key (that way our name for the windows key, or was that the ESC key? Whatever, press your windows key), type in the first two or three letters of your application, and hit enter; you don’t need a mouse at all.

There. It had to be said. :)

13 Comments

  1. John says:

    “Oh, and too many mouse click to access an application? 1) Put your most used apps in the favorites bar (or whatever it is called); it’s just one click then. 2) Press your meta-key (that way our name for the windows key, or was that the ESC key? Whatever, press your windows key), type in the first two or three letters of your application, and hit enter; you don’t need a mouse at all.”

    In GNOME 2 it would take 2 clicks to access every application.

  2. jhr says:

    You don’t need every application — not regularly at least. If you do, you’re doing something wrong.

  3. Meph Jones says:

    I attempted to run Gnome 3 via Fedora on KVM, but it refused to run the default environment because of a non-accelerated graphics driver. Do you need proprietary firmware blobs to run Gnmoe 3? If so, this is as drawback.

  4. Emanuele Aina says:

    “In GNOME 2 it would take 2 clicks to access every application.”

    It’s still so: throw the pointer to the top-left hot corner, click “Applications”, click on the desired application.

    Ok, maybe you have to scroll or add another click on the right section panel (which responds to the mouse wheel, if you prefer) but navigating a big list (or tree) should not be a frequent operation.

  5. Bjoern says:

    @Meph Jones: At the moment you need hardware accelerated 3d graphic to run GNOME Shell. Whether this means that you need a proprietary firmware depends on your graphic card. But this will change soon: http://article.gmane.org/gmane.linux.redhat.fedora.devel/155923

  6. dontfearthepenguin says:

    Yesterday I have migrated to gnome3 (Debian testing), and after that, I have migrated to Xfce almost instantly, after being unable to add additional panels on right and left, after having some info about Gnome not being able to get to the right mode so I’ve stuck in some semi Gnome3 thing (probably because I use nouveau graphics driver that do not support 3d acceleration). There is no any action after right-clicking on desktop (background, colors, anything…), there is no way to customize theme, I had to install some tweaking tool to change theme color! Yeah, it’s so geek thing, you need additional tweaking tool. No maximize button, that is really something new. And a thousand of other things, which I have made in Xfce in 20 minutes from default to my customized behavior.

    So that’s all the story. Maybe that’s because I’m 30+ now, and am looking for some stabilization in computer environment also.

  7. jd823592 says:

    2 clicks in GNOME2? ok but if you had more apps than what would fit into the bar or be easily accesible through apps->desired_category it would get messy, so what use would it be to be able to launch by 2 clicks when you would keep searching for it? ;)

  8. jhr says:

    Debian. The most conservative community ever. Change will make them run.

  9. john says:

    Compare the travel distance in GNOME 2 with GNOME 3 to open an application. This is insane.

  10. jhr says:

    Exactly, john, I’d never go back to GNOME 2.

  11. john says:

    I don’t think you got it: the travel distance is smaller in GNOME2.

  12. jhr says:

    I do get it but a) I don’t think it’s true, and b) you don’t even need the mouse in GNOME3 at all to access an application.

    As I said before: put your favorite apps in the bar for favorite apps. Accessing those is as simple as sliding your mouse to the activities field (no click even ;)) and then down to your app. That’s actually less action than in GNOME 2 menus when you had to open a menu hierarchy first. For all other apps, don’t even bother using your mouse. Keep your hands on the keyboard, press your windows key (or whatever you have there), then the first two or three letters of your app’s name (it doesn’t even have to be the first letters, just something you remember). It’ll probably be the first guess of GNOME 3 (it is for me most of the time anyways), so you just hit enter. That’s so much fastern than looking through a hierarchy of menus which you’d have to look through all over again for those apps you don’t use regularly.

    Really. GNOME 3 isn’t perfect yet. I use 3.2 here mostly and I’m waiting for 3.4. I’m not a version junky. But this really made my life easier. Clinging to old behavior is nice in an environment that is complex to change, like big businesses or whatever, but at home, as a linux nerd, get over yourself and admit that the world moved on — and that’s definitely forward, not backwards here. :)

  13. gushil says:

    well said jhr.
    after tinkering about moving to gnome 3 or not, i decided to give it a go.
    first impression, i like it :)

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